Surfing, Skateboarding, Music, Photography, Travel, Culture and general antics of the youth on the run.

Conversation With: Sam Kristofski A phone call with (one of) our favorite Kiwi filmmakers

/ PRV
Interview: Cam Neate

God damn is there some talent down under Australia making films. From our very own Blake Myers to the big dogs like Take Waititi, there’s some serious creative timing in these films. We recently had the chance to pick the brain of yet another talented kiwi Sam Krisofski.

What Youth: When I look back all your videos and having been fortunate enough to stare at a couple of them, I’m always like, “Fuck these things turn out so good.” Have you even planned any of this? Or do you turn up at a shoot and you’re like so what are we doing? 

Sam Kristofski: Nah, never. If you plan, 9/10 of the time you’re not going to get what you planned. It’s like making a salad. If you’ve got the right ingredients then you’re going to have a good salad.

I had the same analogy. It was about a pizza. If you’ve got enough cheese, the pizza is always going to be good. Have you ever had a pizza that you’re like, “Oh that’s disgusting.”? 

No never.

I’m going to come back to the rules because I feel like there’s a lot of rules in filmmaking but you probably just are opposite. 

Yeah, if you’ve got budget then you have to do the rules and you have to do the planning.

So that’s for commercials and shit? 

Yeah.

kristo17kristo16

Let’s come back that. What things have gone wrong and what have you learned or what mistakes have you made?

I think when you get serious people are used to being paid or do it for money like straight away or they won’t want to work. So that’s always the worst. You get a lot of people who — because you’re working with beautiful models —  get a lot of dudes that come on set and say like, “Wanna hook up?” I’ve had heaps of that and then that creates that kind of weird chemistry and then you’re like, “Come man, what are you up to?” That’s happened quite a few times. Our DP’s are always the worst. That’s why I always stick with one DP because DPs are the worst.

So on that whole rules thing, camera’s assist, director, just all those dudes who hold tape and stuff…

Yeah, you don’t need those either. I’d rather do it myself.

kristo5

Let’s touch on your aesthetics and style and how that started.  What inspires the aesthetics of your pictures?

I came from making films. I was just doing what I wanted to do. I was just making things just how I’d make them, I guess. I made them with the idea that I wanted to do. I was really inspired by Chris Cunningham, like real technical tricks. Then I went away form that and started doing weird kind of story stuff. Then I did this music video for the band Oppossom called “Bad Meanies”

Blue Meanies?

Yeah she is Cody’s partner so she really liked it and so she met up with me. She was like, “Man, I love that stuff! Kinda seemed a little bit inspired by Godard.”  I had no idea who Godard was. So she gave me a bunch of old Godard films to watch and she told me to watch all of them. She said, “I want to do a music video and I want it to be real Godard esque?” So I watched all the films and rang up my friend, and he knew exactly who to hire because I just never watched films or anything. Then I watched it and I was like, “Woah! This is the best thing!” I loved everything about it. I became so obsessed with it because it was exactly how I wanted to make a movie. I had never shot on film before either. So I just got heaps of 16” millimeter film from Fuji. I researched the film that Godard used and so then I just tried to grade it similar to that and I shot it in one day. I was really nervous because I knew how expense it was to develop and so I was real scared that it was going to not look good. I got the results back and I could use everything, there was nothing I couldn’t use. I only had about a half an hour of footage and edited the music video in like thirty minutes. I got it in a single cut in like thirty minutes!

kristo12

Really? Was it because you were so hyped on the footage?

I was real hyped. It was so easy because you have footage to play with. Within three days it was finalized and done. I was sold on it after that. It’s like you edit while you’re filming. Everything I did after that was different because I was changing.

So you’re thinking more about your shots and more in that work flow?

Yeah. I just shot whatever and pick stuff out of it. Now, I just shoot it carefully. I shoot the mess instead of creating a mess and try to pick the good stuff out of that. And then I couldn’t go back after shooting that. I just had to keep shooting film. I couldn’t stop shooting film. Now I feel like I’ve been doing it long enough where I can start doing digital a bit.

What’s next? What’s happening after the album comes out? 

I’m doing a short film series at the moment. There a few potential people getting involved. We’ve done one episode. It’s kind of like the Famous Five and it’s got all sorts of different people that look for UFOs in the desert with scanners and stuff. They take photos of them and then they take them back to the UFO expert. He identifies the UFO and let’s them know if it’s real or not. It’s this little short film series so I’m doing that.

kristo15 kristo14

Is it for something?

It’s for- I can’t really talk about it because I don’t know…

It’s being funded by someone?

Yeah, it’ll come out soon. Then, I’m doing my first digital performance music video this weekend. I never wanted to do it but then they offered it to me and I need to start doing that stuff a little bit to prove to people I can do it because I think they forgot I can do it. I’ve got a couple commercial things as well and finishing the feature and then I’ve got a few companies over in LA. I’ve got two short film scripts that I want to do this year. I think that’s it. My main goal is to make commercials and music videos. I don’t want to do them in a particular style, I want to do them like my own films. This past five years I’ve been trying to find what it is I like doing. I feel like I got it after just last year, I feel like I know what I want to do now. I know what type of films I want to write.

Conversation With: Sam Kristofski A phone call with (one of) our favorite Kiwi filmmakers

God damn is there some talent down under Australia making films. From our very own Blake Myers to the big dogs like Take Waititi, there’s some serious creative timing in these films. We recently had the chance to pick the brain of yet another talented kiwi Sam Krisofski. What Youth: When I look back all…

what youth music

Conversation with: Josh Landau On his new band, Kill a Punk for Rock & Roll 

Josh Landau is an unstoppable force. The frontman and guitarist of The Shrine debuted his new band, Kill a Punk for Rock & Roll, just a couple weeks ago, and the momentum he’s pulling will make your head spin. Alongside Landau in his band of misfits is Jordan Jones on guitar, Don “Nuge” Nguyen on…

what youth recommends the britanys

Conversation With: The Britanys Brooklyn’s lo-fi garage band that’ll remind you of the Strokes

In case you were wondering why Brooklyn band The Britanys have a missing T in their name, blame frontman Lucas Long. “I’m a really bad speller,” he told me before their show at the Satellite in Los Angeles last month. Together with Steele Kratt on drums, Jake Williams on guitar, and Lucas Carpenter on bass,…

Conversation with Twin Peaks.

Conversation With: Twin Peaks Gas station phone conversations

Chicago does a lot of cool shit for rock n roll and lately running wild about the town is a band of garage rockers whose name you probably have been seeing pop up a lot, Twin Peaks. If you’re wondering how and where these guys came from, keep your ears peeled because, unless you despise the…

what youth music

Conversation With: Darren Rademaker The leadsinger and founder of The Tyde on his new album and his life lived playing music

I’ve known Darren Rademaker, lead singer and founder of The Tyde and seminal indie bands Further and the Summer Hits, for the better part of a decade. I’ve seen him play more than a hundred times, at least, and it really never gets old for me. He just released his fourth album with The Tyde,…

Conversation With: Alexander Schmidt On his new zine “Side Streets”, street skating and street photography

I’ve been a fan of WKND since I found out about them. Aesthetically, they’re great. But what’s also great is the personalities that exist in their crew. I discovered one of their talents, Alexander Schmidt when they announced the release party for his new zine, Side Streets. I couldn’t make it, but I loved what…

Conversation With: Adult Books The same guys that played our Issue 14 release party

“Our first band, I was fifteen, you were eighteen,” says Daniel Quintanilla, bassist and vocalist of Adult Books. He’s referring to Nick Winfrey, the band’s guitarist and vocalist and main poodle aficionado, who, I’m pretty sure, taught Quintanilla how to drive. Together with drummer M.M. Sina, who lived a block away from Winfrey in Orange…

Conversation With: Susan Plus the premiere of their new video, “Somebody New”

Susan is a band, and we’ve been in love with them ever since they let us use their song “Windows Down” in Episode 1 of 4 Cities with Ozzie Wright (by the way, watch that). Comprised of Jessica Owen on guitar, Beth B on bass and Katie Fern on drums, Susan mixes elements of pop…

conversation with yung

Conversation With: Yung Because we’re obsessed with this band

We told you to listen to Yung a couple months ago, and not only are we taking our own advice, but we’re still basically obsessed with them. Their debut album, A Youthful Dream, has been dominating our eardrums since we first hit that play button. So read our interview with the band below, and keep…

Conversation With: Audacity Plus the World Premiere of their new video for “Not Like You”

Orange County’s staple garage-punk band Audacity is pounding on your door with another ruckus album, and you’re bound to fall in pop-punk-love with it. If you haven’t had the privilege of growing up with Audacity records through your punk rock teen years, or had the chance to get high off their endless energy at one…

kera and the lesbians hood on

Conversation With: Kera and the Lesbians Elvis, that name and their new record

Kera Armendariz, the frontman and lead singer of Kera and the Lesbians, is, and ignore my cheesy cliché, in it to win it. “I see myself as a longevity artist,” she says with calm confidence. She’s been writing and playing music since she was young, when she discovered what would become a lifelong love for…

what youth conversation with robbie simon

Conversation With: Robbie Simon “If you’re happy where you are, every step along the way was right.”

Robbie Simon, the Los Angeles-based artist, is modest when speaking about his talent. “If you would’ve told me even three years ago that I would be having a show of paintings, I wouldn’t have believed you.” He’s most recognizable as the designer for Allah-las posters and flyers and merchandise, essentially their contributing art director. But…